The Miraculous Medal – Wear it!

We a re-blogging an article written by Amy Brooks on the importance of wearing the Miraculous Medal.  Be sure you have yours on today!

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5 Reasons I Wear a Miraculous Medal – And Why You Should Try It Too!

5 Reasons I Wear a Miraculous Medal – And Why You Should Try It Too

by Amy BrooksMarch 3, 2016

via catholicismpure.wordpress.com / ChurchPOP

The Mirauculous Medal is a special medal design based on mystical visions of St. Catherine Labouré in the 19th century. It’s a popular devotional item and is associated with miracles and conversions.

1) I am being reminded daily to “listen to my Mother”

As a mommy of a three and a half year old boy, I’ve been hearing the word “no” A LOT.

Me: “Xavier, go to the potty”  Xavier: No  Me: “Don’t say no to me, just do it”  Xavier: “No!”.

This happens countless times a day. As you can imagine, this can be extremely frustrating. I wonder if Mary gets frustrated with us.

Almost 200 years ago Our Blessed Mother instructed Saint Catherine Laboure to “have a medal struck upon this model. Those who wear it will receive great graces, especially if they wear it around their neck.” Our Blessed Mother also told Catherine, “Now it must be given to the whole world and to every person.” For almost two hundred years this message has been available to us, yet –until this past Christmas, I still did not wear one around my neck.

I wonder if Mary is frustrated, as any mother is when children do not take her advice or accept her help! I know how I feel after a 30 minute debate with a three year old on why he has to at least try to pee.  Two hundred years of, “wear this, it will help” and so many not listening has got to be exhausting!

2) It’s Known as the “Miraculous Medal” for a Reason, and I Love a Miracle!

When the medal first came into being, it was called the Medal of the Immaculate Conception. In less than ten years it became known as the Miraculous Medal because of the many graces and wonders that quickly became associated with wearing it. According to one source, between 1930 and 1950, more than 750,000 favors were granted and registered in just the city of Philadelphia alone.

Our Blessed Mother wants us to ask her for prayers. Our Lord wants us to go to Him and tell him what is on our minds and in our hearts.  Having this medal around our necks at all times is a constant reminder to pray. And as Mary promised, those who wear it will receive great graces.

3) Heroic Men and Women Have Worn It and Encouraged Others to Wear It

Two particular individuals come to mind: St. Maximillian Kolbe and Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta.  Before St. Maximillian courageously gave his life for another man, he started a movement and an organization, known in English as the Knights of the Immaculata. He made the Miraculous Medal the insignia of the group and had each member wear the medal. He said it was a “silver bullet” against evil.

Mother Teresa of Calcutta, known for her charitable work throughout the world, called it a “medal of charity” and gave it out by the hand full.  She said that the medal is a sign that God loves each and every individual at each and every moment of our lives.

4) It’s a Reminder to Ask for Help

The images on the medal were designed by the Blessed Mother and spoken to St. Catherine Laboure. Our Blessed Mother said that the rays coming from some of her fingers demonstrate the graces God gives through her to those who ask and are open.

There are some fingers where no rays are shown. Mary said that is to demonstrate the graces that are not given because they were not requested of her.  Just another reminder of Matthew 7:7; “Ask and it shall be given to you”.

5) It’s a Symbol of What’s Most Important

When I first wrote this article, my Facebook profile picture included an opaque flag of France to show my support and prayers for those who have suffered a great tragedy.  There is a U.S. flag hung outside the front door of our home to demonstrate patriotism.  We often wear colors to support those affected by different diseases and when we are cheering for our favorite sports team, we wear the appropriate jersey.  All of these have some importance in our lives.  But what is most important?  For me, it is my faith.  If signs and symbols are important for the lesser things, why not show my enthusiasm for the greatest blessing of all – faith in Our Lord and the love of our Mother.

For Christmas, I asked for and received a Miraculous Medal.  There are so many different styles made by many different companies and organizations.  I searched and browsed hundreds, finally finding a simple style necklace that I feel fits my personality.  I wear it daily.  I find comfort in it.  I’m so grateful for the gift of grace and peace it gives.

Want One?

If you would like a Miraculous Medal, you can get a FREE one from  The Central Association of the Miraculous Medal! The Central Association’s primary mission is “to render honor to Mary Immaculate and to encourage the use of her Miraculous Medal with prayers and devotions to her”. The Central Association offers a free Miraculous Medal to anyone living in the United States.

Originally posted on Prayer, Wine, Chocolate

A Glimpse of Hell is all it Took

https://americaneedsfatima.org/Conversions/conversion-on-death-row.html

In 1943, twenty-year-old Claude Newman was awaiting execution in a Mississippi prison for shooting Sid Cook, his beloved grandmother’s abusive second husband. One day, Claude noticed a medal hanging around the neck of a fellow prisoner, and asked the young man what it was. The latter responded by casting the medal to the ground with a curse and said, “take it.”  Unbeknownst to him, the curious pendant was a Miraculous Medal. Even though he knew nothing about it or who it represented, Claude picked up the trinket and hung it around his neck. He had no idea how that simple action would change his life.

Visions

Man praying

During the night, Claude was awakened by a glowing vision, which he later described as “the most beautiful woman that God ever created.” The vision calmed the frightened man and said, “If you would like me to be your mother, and you my child, send for a priest of the Catholic Church.

And she disappeared. “A ghost, a ghost!” screamed Claude, clamoring for a priest. The next morning, Fr. Robert O’Leary (who later recorded the story) was summoned.  After listening to the extraordinary account and speaking with him, the priest discovered Claude to be a very simple, illiterate soul who knew very little about religion.

The priest proceeded to teach the young man about Catholicism, and soon the catechism lessons grew to include four other inmates who were deeply impressed by Claude’s vision.  Several weeks later, Father introduced the Sacrament of Confession, and Claude volunteered, 

Oh, I know about that! The Lady told me that when we go to confession we are kneeling down not before a priest, but before the Cross of Her Son. And that when we are truly sorry for our sins, and we confess our sins, the Blood He shed flows down over us and washes us free from all sins.”  The others were stunned at this new revelation. Seeing their surprise, Claude apologized, “Oh, don’t be angry, don’t be angry, I didn’t mean to blurt it out!”

Revelation

Assuring him that he was far from angry, Fr. O’Leary asked Claude if he had seen the lady again. Taking the priest aside, the young man said, “she told me that if you doubted me or showed hesitancy, I was to remind you that lying in a ditch in Holland in 1940, you made a vow to her which She’s still waiting for you to keep.”  This revelation fully convinced him of Claude’s claims. During the war, Fr. O’Leary had promised to erect a church in honor of the Immaculate Conception if he survived. He fulfilled the promise in 1947, and the church still stands in Clarksdale, Mississippi. As Father and Claude returned to the class on Confession, Claude told his friends, “You should not be afraid of Confession. You’re really telling God your sins, not the priest. You know, the Lady said that Confession is something like a telephone. We talk through the priest to God, and God talks back to us through the priest.”

Finally, the catechumens were received into the Church. In the baptismal records of St. Mary’s parish in Vicksburg, MS, Claude’s baptism is registered on January 16, 1944, four days before his scheduled execution. As the day neared, the Sheriff asked Claude if he had a last request.

“Well, all my friends are all shook up. The jailer is all shook up. But you don’t understand. I’m not going to die; only this body is. I’m going to be with her. So, then, I would like to have a party.”  

The Sheriff was shocked, but consented, and even allowed Claude’s fellow inmates to attend.

Execution

On the morning of execution, Claude was full of joy. As he mentally prepared himself with Fr. O’Leary, the Sheriff rushed in shouting that the Governor had granted a two-week reprieve. To his amazement, the young man broke down in sobs, inconsolable.

But you don’t understand! If you ever saw her face, and looked into her eyes, you wouldn’t want to live another day! …What have I done wrong these past weeks that God would refuse me my going home? …Why, Father?  Why must I still remain here for two weeks?”   

Suddenly, Fr. O’Leary had an inspiration. James Hughs, a fellow prisoner on death row, harbored a particular hate for Claude and all things religious despite having been raised a Catholic. Fr. O’Leary suggested that Claude offer his disappointment for Hughs’ conversion, and the final two weeks of the young man’s life were spent praying for the salvation of his fellow inmate.

Claude was finally executed on February 4, 1944. Fr. O’Leary testified: “ I’ve never seen anyone go to his death as joyfully and as happily. Even the official witnesses and the newspaper reporters were amazed. They said they couldn’t understand how anyone could sit in the electric chair beaming with happiness.”

To heaven, but not alone

Claude Newman and the Virgin Mary the Teacher Icon

When the time came for James Hughs to be executed, he violently refused all spiritual assistance, cursing and blaspheming even while seated on the electric chair. Suddenly, looking intently towards a corner of the room, a look of surprise came over his face, quickly followed by one of sheer horror, he shouted, “Get me a priest!”  Fr. O’Leary approached and heard the man’s full confession, and ask him to explain his change of mind. The condemned man had seen Claude Newman and the Blessed Virgin standing behind him, her hands on his shoulders. Per Claude’s request, Our Lady showed James a glimpse of Hell, and filled with horror, he immediately demanded a priest.

Once again, the simple wearing of the Miraculous Medal called down our mother’s gaze, and saved not only one, but many souls in that Mississippi Prison.